How to host a green Halloween

How to host a green Halloween

Posted By Amanda Saxby

It’s that time of the year again when ghouls, vampires and the stuff of nightmares come out for one night. For revelers, it’s a time to don costumes and go trick-or-treating, put up Halloween decorations and eat candy. More than 179 million Americans are expected to partake in this year’s Halloween with an estimated $9.1 billion spend; that’s a frightful amount to celebrate what was once considered an ancient Celtic festival. But there’s a way to celebrate a green Halloween! We’ve collated a list of Halloween ideas to make your party less devilish and more enchantingly eco-friendly.

Recycled Halloween Costumes 101

Who doesn’t love a spooky dress-up party? This year, a hair-raising $3.4 billion will be spent on Halloween costumes in the United States, and the majority of these costumes are made from flimsy, synthetic materials and trashed after one use.

Instead of purchasing a new costume this Halloween, why not borrow or reuse an old one from friends or family? If this isn’t an option, rummaging through thrift stores or your closet may be the next step away from your Bride of Frankenstein or bogeyman costume. All you need is a little bit of imagination and a touch of gruesome makeup! 

Painting Your Face the Green Way

How to host a green Halloween

The right makeup can turn anyone into a ghoul, goblin or the Grim Reaper. However, with the myriad of face paints out on the market, it’s essential to pick one that’s lead-free and toxic-free.

We’re so happy that we’ve discovered a fabulous organic alternative. Go Green face paint has no parabens, lead or heavy metals and uses a rich-cream base, which makes it easier to use with brushes. It is made in the USA, complies with FDA and EPA requirements and is suitable for vegans. 

From Home to Haunted House: The Sustainable Way

If you want to go all out this Halloween, turn your home into a haunted house with these eco-friendly ideas that won’t cost the earth! Porch ghouls, skeletons and creepy crawlies can all be recreated using upcycled materials. Sustainable alternatives, like this list collated by Care2, are much better than purchasing plastic, throwaway decorations.

If you’re hosting a party, we recommend using what you currently have in your kitchen. But if you must use disposable party products, Susty Party products get our vote, which are sustainable and compostable, not to mention plastic-free and non-toxic.

A Spooktacular Lighting Display

How to host a green HalloweenGreat lighting is needed to create a spooky atmosphere. If you’re purchasing candles, purchase ones that are ethically-made, paraben-free and not tested on animals.

Alternatively, we love this by Dialeklity. It uses an LED cool light that’s energy efficient and does not use lasers, making it kid-safe. With 14 interchangeable festival patterns, you’re bound to use it again and again and save money on purchasing lighting decorations for each holiday.

Don’t Forget the Jack-o-Lantern!

While the Howden pumpkin traditionally used for carving is edible, you may not want to eat it after it’s been exposed to dirt, wax, insects and smoke. We love the idea of donating it to a local farm to be composted, instead of throwing it in the trash where it will end up in landfill. The Department of Energy reports that landfill pumpkins turn into methane when burned, a harmful greenhouse gas that plays a part in climate change.

Candy and Trick-or-Treats… Oh my!

How to host a green Halloween

Halloween isn’t Halloween without candy and trick-or-treating. Ditch the drugstore candy corn this year and reach for eco-friendly candy that won’t compromise your health or damage the environment.

We love these organic, natural lollipops and gummy bears by YumEarth, which have no artificial colors or flavors and are free from top allergens.

Last but not the least, don’t forget to use reusable trick-or-treating containers, may they be cloth or canvas bags, buckets or pillowcases.

Happy Trick-or-Treating!

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